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Wednesday
Nov102010

Cesarean Rates by State, 2008

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By Jill—Unnecesarean

 

Percent of babies born by cesarean delivery, each state: preliminary 2008 

1

New Jersey

38.7

2

Louisiana

38.0

3

Florida

37.6

4

Mississippi

37.1

5

West Virginia

35.5

6

Connecticut

35.1

7

Kentucky

35.0

8

Alabama

34.9

9

Arkansas

34.6

10T

New York

34.5

10T

Texas

34.5

12T

Oklahoma

34.2

12T

South Carolina

34.2

14

Massachusetts

34.1

15

Virginia

34.0

16T

Nevada

33.8

16T

Tennessee

33.8

18

Rhode Island

33.3

19

Delaware

33.2

20

Maryland

33.1

21

Georgia

32.9

22

California

32.6

23

New Hampshire

31.9

24

Michigan

31.5

25

Missouri

31.1

26

Nebraska

31.0

27T

Illinois

30.9

27T

Pennsylvania

30.9

29

North Carolina

30.8

30

Ohio

30.6

31

Maine

30.4

32

Kansas

30.1

33

Indiana

30.0

34

Washington

29.4

35

Iowa

29.3

36

Montana

29.2

37

Oregon

28.9

38

North Dakota

28.1

39

Vermont

27.2

40

Arizona

27.1

41

Wyoming

27.0

42

Hawaii

26.8

43

South Dakota

26.6

44

Minnesota

26.4

45

Colorado

25.9

46

Wisconsin

25.2

47

Idaho

24.4

48

New Mexico

22.9

49

Alaska

22.6

50

Utah

22.0

United States: 32.3
SOURCE: CDC National Center for Health Statistics

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Reader Comments (19)

What's amazing is not just that the numbers are so high in general, but the fact that Utah's rate is 22% while New Jersey's rate is almost 39%. I can't imagine that patient factors account for most of that difference, so it must be related to labor management (birth setting, interventions, access to VBAC, midwives, etc.), right?

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterKK

*Glances at Public Health Hat on faraway shelf*
*Picks up nearby Excel nerd hat and places on head*

compared to 2007 (from here: www.theunnecesarean.com/blog/2010/2/13/cesarean-delivery-rates-by-state-2007.html)

Biggest absolute drop in rate: New Mexico - down 0.4 percentage points from 2007 (relative change of -1.7%)
Biggest absolute rise in rate: Louisiana - up 2.1 percentage points from 2007 (relative change of 5.85%)
States experiencing no change or a drop in rate: 9 total (NM ND MT UT AR IA AK MD SD) (of these, only Arkansas and Maryland had rates over 30% to start with)
States experiencing a rise in rate: 41 total (Arizona is notable for having a low-ish overall rate but a big rise from 07-08)

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterJMT

Cracked had an article about 5 overused/overhyped medical procedures, and C-Sections came up on their list. If the frat-boys at Cracked think c-sections happen to often, maybe other people ought to listen too.

http://www.cracked.com/article_18840_5-common-medical-procedures-that-secretly-arent-worth-it.html

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterRebekah

Hi, how does that match with the maternal and infant mortality rates? Seeing them side by side, with other countries for comparison would be an eye opener...

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterVicki

I need advice! I was FORCED to have a repeat C-Section. Literally FORCED! The hospital denied me pain medication (my contractions were 2 minutes apart, water broken, 3 cm dilated) when I arrived. I was told the doctor on call "does not do VBAC's" (who's doin' the pushing here Mister????) and that they would not give me pain meds because I was going to have a C-section. They refused to call my midwife or even let ME call her. I argued with the nurse and the doctor, gritting my teeth during contractions, while they repeatedly waived a consent form in my face and told me I was wrong. I refuse to sign, they threatened to "treat me as hostile" (I was led to believe that they were going to put me in restraints), I finally couldn't bear the pain any longer, called them fascists and put a giant M on the consent line (that was all I could manage in my state and through my tears). They broke several laws in my opinion, but I can not seem to find anyone who will point me in the right direction for advice. I "signed" that form under duress and because it was the only way I could get them to get it out of my face while I was having contractions!! I am furious! Someone please help!!

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterMelissa

Melissa, I'm e-mailing you.

November 10, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill

Consumer Reports also called cesareans "overused" back in 2007 (although I wish they hadn't mentioned speeding up labor):

"CESAREAN SECTIONS. They cost almost $7,000, about 55 percent more than a natural delivery, and constituted a record high of 30.2 percent of births in 2005. Most are performed because labor is progressing too slowly. But several less-invasive approaches might be enough to speed up labor."

http://www.consumerreports.org/health/doctors-hospitals/medical-ripoffs/10-overused-tests-and-treatments/medical-ripoffs-ten-over_1.htm

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterKK

:gag: I HATE that I was apart of this statistic. I still mourn that birth to this day. It could have been better. The next HBAC is going to prove it.

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterCandice

Sad to see that the lowest one is still 22%. As another poster commented, I'd be very interested to see the neonatal mortality rates for each state side-by-side.

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterAugusta

The NJ cesarean rate is not exactly accurate. They obtain their number by taking an average cesarean rate for almost all the hospitals. They exclude hospitals without a maternity unit (these hospitals usually get a couple births for various reasons so some of them technically have a 0% cesarean rate or a 100% cesarean rate). If they actually looked at the raw numbers and calculated the total number of cesareans based on the total number of births, the cesarean rate was actually 39.4% in 2008.

November 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterDana
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