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Thursday
Dec022010

Connecticut Cesarean Rates by Hospital, 2007

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  # Births  # of C/S C/S Rate VBAC % Epis.
Bridgeport Hospital 2592 1012 39.0% 3.3% 7.4%
Bristol Hospital 693 201 29.0% 7.1% 3.5%
Charlotte Hungerford Hospital 459 171 37.3% 0.0% 11.5%
Danbury Hospital 2446 736 30.1% 9.1% 2.5%
Day Kimball Hospital 577 149 25.8% 0.0% 11.3%
Greenwich Hospital 2188 814 37.2% 7.2% 12.3%
Griffin Hospital 761 247 32.5% 9.4% 10.5%
Hartford Hospital 4071 1554 38.2% 4.3% 4.1%
Hospital of St. Raphael 1440 463 32.2% 2.0% 5.1%
John Dempsey Hospital (UCONN) 850 370 43.5% 5.5% 1.3%
Johnson Memorial Hospital 300 87 29.0% 7.1% 12.0%
Lawrence & Memorial Hospital 1739 637 36.6% 14.3% 6.9%
Manchester Memorial Hospital 1078 296 27.5% 2.3% 5.1%
Middlesex Memorial Hospital 1176 441 37.5% 15.1% 7.7%
Midstate Medical Center 1082 333 30.8% 1.3% 17.3%
Milford Hospital 557 203 36.4% 2.5% 7.9%
New Milford Hospital 294 104 35.4% 6.9% 21.8%
Norwalk Hospital 1616 519 32.1% 7.0% 10.1%
Rockville General Hospital 441 117 26.5% 4.8% 15.0%
Saint Francis Hospital 2895 904 31.2% 14.6% 8.6%
Saint Mary’s Hospital 1298 386 29.7% 5.3% 5.9%
Saint Vincent Medical Center 1211 539 44.5% 5.3% 7.9%
Sharon Hospital 236 75 31.8% 7.4% 12.7%
Stamford Hospital 2638 1002 38.0% 0.0% 19.6%
The Hospital of Central CT 1975 611 30.9% 7.0% 4.9%
Waterbury Hospital 1311 472 36.0% 10.6% 11.8%
William W. Backus Hospital 1046 318 30.4% 9.2% 5.4%
Windham Community Memorial 439 129 29.4% 4.0% 1.1%
Yale New Haven Hospital 4557 1591 34.9% 10.0% 4.9%
  41966 14481 34.6% 6.3% 7.9%

 

SOURCE: Connecticut Department of Public Health, HISR Section, HCQSAR Unit, August 2009.

 

Hospital

Singleton vertex C/S

All C/S

%

Bridgeport Hospital

957

1,019

94%

Bristol Hospital

181

200

91%

Charlotte Hungerford Hospital

159

169

94%

Danbury Hospital

656

710

92%

Day Kimball Hospital

140

143

98%

Greenwich Hospital

768

822

93%

Griffin Hospital

210

236

89%

Hartford Hospital

1,431

1,540

93%

Hospital of Central Connecticut

534

580

92%

Hospital of Saint Raphael

456

482

95%

John Dempsey Hospital

300

369

81%

Johnson Memorial Hospital

81

83

98%

Lawrence and Memorial Hospital

649

684

95%

Manchester Memorial Hospital

295

304

97%

Middlesex Memorial Hospital

390

417

94%

MidState Medical Center

310

326

95%

Milford Hospital

190

199

95%

New Milford Hospital

107

108

99%

Norwalk Hospital

494

521

95%

Rockville General Hospital

118

119

99%

Saint Francis Hospital

853

918

93%

Saint Mary’s Hospital

365

386

95%

Saint Vincent’s Medical Center

544

556

98%

Sharon Hospital

78

85

92%

Stamford Hospital

868

979

89%

Waterbury Hospital

470

484

97%

William W. Backus Hospital

284

300

95%

Windham Community Memorial Hospital

124

135

92%

Yale-New Haven Hospital

1,419

1,587

89%

Total

13,431

14,461

93%

 

 

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Reader Comments (8)

Wow! The singleton vertex c/sec compared to the total c/sec population is very very interesting. Makes one wonder why so many... obviously breech and twins are not driving this!

December 3, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterAnne

Does anyone know - when a percent episiotomy is reported, is it percent of vaginal birth or percent total birth? Because if it's a percent of total births, that means the real number is almost double (since you're not really eligible for an episiotomy if they're cutting higher up), and much harder to compare.

And if anyone is interested - I did a quick analysis and there is absolutely no correlation between C/S rate and epi rate.

December 3, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterlarissa

Larissa,

CT was calculated by the DPH. but epis rate is # epis/ # vaginal births.

December 3, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill

I believe one of my SILs had an episiotomy even though she ultimately had a C/s -- the doctor attempted high forceps, and most if not all of the times, it's necessary to cut an episiotomy first.

December 3, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterKathy

Thanks for sharing this Jill!
It took us almost 6 months to get these numbers from the DPH, and then had to calculate all the percentages ourselves!

December 3, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterDanielle

Thank YOU, Danielle. You do good work.

December 3, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill

Hi. I'm not familiar with all this I suppose. where do the VBAC numbers come from. if they are percents, my first guess would be that those are the % of all births that ended in a vaginal delivery, but that doesn't seem to make any sense.


I've never had a kid myself, but I am fascinated by birth, and when the time is right for me, I want to be informed.

December 5, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterLauren

Lauren, VBAC is vaginal birth after cesarean. The VBAC rate is typically calculated by dividing numbers of VBACs and numbers of women with a prior cesarean section.

Welcome! Glad to have you here.

December 5, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill
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