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Sunday
Feb282010

Cesarean Rates and Premature Birth in the Southern United States

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Please note that this post is not linking all of this data together or offering any commentary or speculation. It’s just interesting to see things side-by-side.

What else should we add to this post? I’m working on a map of maternal mortality rates and trying to figure out which data to use.

 

 

 

 

Source: http://www.marchofdimes.com/EHP09450PADReportCardMapREVISED.pdf

 

 

 

 

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).

 

 

 

                                    

All race categories exclude Hispanics. Categories do not sum to total since missing ethnicity data are not shown. 

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, final natality data.

Retrieved February 28, 2010, from http://www.marchofdimes.com/peristats.

 

 

 

 

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, final natality data.Retrieved February 28, 2010, from http://www.marchofdimes.com/peristats.

 

 

 

 

Source: Census 2000 analyzed by the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN).

 

 

Related Post:

Quick Hit: Geographic Variation in the Appropriate Use of Cesarean Delivery

 

2007 U.S. Cesarean Rate Posts:

Cesarean Delivery Rates by State, 2007

Map of Cesarean Delivery Rates by State, 2007

C-Section Rate Rises: 2007 U.S. Cesarean Rate Hit 31.8 Percent

 

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Reader Comments (15)

Interesting charts. One thing that might need to be clarified, is the tendency of hospitals to under-report what could be considered negatives...for instance, in Richmond Virginia, there is a hospital with a nearly 50% c/s rate...granted the majority of clients are low income, but I lived in Southside for 20 years, and tried to encourage both self-education and homebirth...and midwifery...That is the best ticket out of these bad stats, I would think...:)
Here is a link to the VA obstricians comparison chart...http://www.vhi.org/ob_report_results_phys.asp Note that some of the docs have nearly a 50% c/s rate, and the ones with the lowest rate, are often the best docs, cuz they know how to avoid surgery(unneeded)! Dr. Naved Jafri in Hampton, (I have worked with him before) is a case in point. He lets the dads help catch the baby, encourages waterlabor(hospitals didn't allow birth in water) and was more like a midwife than a doc...But his "rating" is not as high as the ones who cut more, so I suspect the VDOH's criteria on what is "good' care is a little skewed, wouldn't you? Great work, keep up the good work...

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterCathi

Also, you might want to check with Ina May Gaskin. She might have some insight on the Maternal mortality stats, since she specialises in that..(as part of the Safe Motherhood Initiative)

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterCathi

I think the biggest factor here is the tendancy for women in the South to be more submissive to authority in general. Its the Southern-Belle theory. Etiquette prohibits them from questioning a doctor's orders.

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterBethany B

Be very careful when making such broad, sweeping generalizations, Bethany. Stereotypes are a flawed resource in reasoning.

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterMonkey Mama

I think the biggest factor here is the tendancy for women in the South to be more submissive to authority in general. Its the Southern-Belle theory. Etiquette prohibits them from questioning a doctor's orders.

right! And women in the northeast get cut because they're pushy and want to schedule their births around their jobs, and west coast women get cut because they want a tummy tuck at the same time. It's the "ballbusting new Englander" and "vapid Hollywood babe" theories!

Are you kidding? Because I am and I hope you are too.

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterCourtroom Mama

"Also, you might want to check with Ina May Gaskin."

Good call. The crude data on the CDC site would be a headache to sort through. I don't know if abortion related deaths should be included and such and I don't want to screw it up.

March 1, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill

This might be more broad than what you want, but what about breastfeeding rates? That should be easy to find, although I suspect it anti-correlates with the poverty rate.

Two other statistics which are interesting, but probably tricky to find, are epidural rate and doula rate. I'd guess the latter is strongly anti-correlated with the poverty rate.

What about education levels? Or is that tied closely enough to the poverty rate that it's not an additional bit of useful information?

Oh! What about average age of the mother?

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterBecky

The statement about questioning docs in the south, she is right. In the south you don't question your docs if you do you are a radical. I do question my doc but man, I have had run ins left and right about it and I am seen as NOT the norm. I talk with many women and they simply don't question them because that is just how it is. Sad.

God Bless,
Harley

A Mamas Nirvana Birth Services
nmjennette@tds.net
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A woman meets herself in childbirth. Callaigh

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterNirvana (Harley)

If there is a connection, it's interesting that Alaska, which has plenty of poverty, is so low on c/secs, but maybe that's a function of low population and few hospitals.

March 1, 2010 | Unregistered Commenteremjaybee

Some good ideas here for additional maps. Thanks.

March 2, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill
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