Looking for something? Start here.
Custom Search

 

Want The Unnecesarean in your inbox? Enter your email address:




 

   

« An Actual Introduction-Introduction by Emjaybee | Substituting Schmaltz for Substance: Another Look at "Inside the O.R." »
Monday
Feb082010

Good BaZi for Baby by Cesarean

Bookmark and Share

Share 

A service is available that will help new moms ensure that their baby will have good BaZi by being born by cesarean section on an auspicious day and time.

 

Text: If you are expecting a baby and you want the baby to have a good bazi, this is a service for you. The objective of this service is to identify a date and time for cesarean birth so that the baby is born with a good bazi. The identification of date and time for cesarean birth is only carried out when the expected date for birth and the sex of the baby are known. The identification of date and time is carried out on the 14 days preceding the expected date of birth. To understand this service, please read the FAQ for BaZi for Cesarean Birth.

 

Cited as lucky is Tiger Woods.

 

Does anyone know if scheduling cesareans to have an auspicious birthday is an actual trend as opposed to a sensationalized media nugget?

 

 

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments (6)

I had to go look up Ba Zi, found an explanation here

February 8, 2010 | Unregistered Commenteremjaybee

I'm and L and D nurse and we've had several Indian families request specific days or times and inevitably some of them have had to be bumped for non-scheduled c-sections and we've dealt with very unhappy family members---I wouldn't say it's a lot of people, but I've run across at least 3 in the last year.

February 9, 2010 | Unregistered Commentercileag

Wow. It's so interesting to me that having a primary cesarean for the sake of a good birthday could outweigh the risks of having one's abdomen open for no reason. It must be very culturally important.

February 9, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill

I certainly agree that choosing c-section for "lucky birthday" is hard to understand.

But, I suppose some of these could be people who have been told by doctors they need surgical birth (perhaps legitimately - perhaps questionably - but *they* believe it) and then decide as long as it is happening anyway, choosing a luckier date vs. another in a given week.

If I believed in numerology, and knew I was stuck going into a risky abdominal surgery, I'd sure as heck want to choose the most auspicious date!

February 9, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterMegan

I could see exercising control in the date for scheduled cesareans.

February 9, 2010 | Registered CommenterJill

I have read that this is part of the trend of increased surgical birth, especially in China where c-sec are up close to 50% now with 25% or more of these admittedly for non-medical reasons. This (choosing date/time) was one of the reasons cited, along with "avoidance of labor pain" and that many women believe it's a safer option.

From WHO report 'Delivery settings and caesarean section rates in China-2007' "...there is growing evidence that many women choose delivery by caesarean section for personal reasons, particularly in profit-motivated institutional settings that may provide implicit or explicit encouragement for such interventions." A very nice way of saying doctors are encouraging it to increase profit. (Surprised?)

"Consistent with our findings, a cohort study showed that women are increasingly inclined to opt for delivery by caesarean for non-medical reasons such as fear of labour pain, concerns about date or time of birth that are traditionally believed to be auspicious and the belief that delivery by caesarean ensures protection of the baby’s brain."
This is referring to fears that babies are damaged during vaginal birth by use of forceps and other tools that doctors use to pull the baby out. They certainly have a valid point on this, risk vs. benefit, if doctors are routinely using forceps, which I couldn't deduce from the info I found.

Just more to think about.

February 9, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterKaren Angstadt
Comments for this entry have been disabled. Additional comments may not be added to this entry at this time.