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Monday
Sep192011

Mississippi Cesarean Rates, 2010

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By Jill Arnold

Mississippi ranked fifth in the United States in percentage of cesarean deliveries in 2009, following Louisiana, New Jersey, New York and Florida.


Cesarean Rates by Facility, 2010

 

 

# C/S

 

# Births

 

%

2010

 

14,423

 

39,174

 

36.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Mississippi Medical Center West Point

 

175

 

241

 

72.6

Woman’s Hospital at River Oaks

 

907

 

1,537

 

59.0

Mississippi Baptist Medical Center

 

499

 

1,045

 

47.8

King’s Daughters Medical Center

 

305

 

640

 

47.7

Central Mississippi Medical Center

 

483

 

1,025

 

47.1

Grenada Lake Medical Center

 

205

 

451

 

45.5

South Sunflower County Hospital

 

116

 

261

 

44.4

Rush Foundation Hospital

 

384

 

881

 

43.6

Madison County Medical Center

 

105

 

243

 

43.2

River Oaks Hospital

 

833

 

1,967

 

42.3

St. Dominic Jackson Memorial Hospital

 

529

 

1,272

 

41.6

Wesley Medical Center

 

618

 

1,582

 

39.1

Anderson Regional Medical Center

 

468

 

1,237

 

37.8

University Hospital & Health System

 

1,083

 

2,880

 

37.6

Northwest Mississippi Regional Medical Center

 

367

 

976

 

37.6

Magee General Hospital

 

39

 

104

 

37.5

Bolivar Medical Center

 

154

 

412

 

37.4

Forrest General Hospital

 

876

 

2,357

 

37.2

Southwest Mississippi Regional Medical Center

 

346

 

938

 

36.9

Biloxi Regional Medical Center

 

272

 

746

 

36.5

Ocean Springs Hospital

 

349

 

960

 

36.4

Memorial Hospital at Gulfport

 

478

 

1,357

 

35.2

Tri Lakes Medical Center

 

59

 

169

 

34.9

Natchez Regional Medical Center

 

157

 

459

 

34.2

Baptist Memorial Hospital DeSoto

 

686

 

2,018

 

34.0

Magnolia Regional Health Center

 

169

 

500

 

33.8

Natchez Community Hospital

 

178

 

548

 

32.5

Riley Hospital

 

108

 

332

 

32.5

Baptist Memorial Hospital Union County

 

360

 

1,113

 

32.3

Gilmore Memorial Regional Medical Center

 

172

 

536

 

32.1

North Mississippi Medical Center

 

721

 

2,254

 

32.0

South Central Regional Medical Center

 

298

 

939

 

31.7

Baptist Memorial Hospital North Mississippi

 

288

 

911

 

31.6

Singing River Hospital

 

217

 

721

 

30.1

Garden Park Medical Center

 

153

 

519

 

29.5

Highland Community Hospital

 

97

 

333

 

29.1

River Region Health System

 

218

 

780

 

27.9

Wayne General Hospital

 

60

 

220

 

27.3

Greenwood Leflore Hospital

 

205

 

757

 

27.1

Baptist Memorial Hospital Golden Triangle

 

225

 

907

 

24.8

Hancock Medical Center

 

51

 

209

 

24.4

Delta Regional Medical Center Main Campus

 

208

 

893

 

23.3

Oktibbeha County Hospital

 

202

 

929

 

21.7

Leake Memorial Hospital

 

0

 

6

 

0.0

King’s Daughters Hospital Yazoo County

 

0

 

4

 

0.0

Laird Hospital

 

0

 

2

 

0.0

Marion General Hospital

 

0

 

2

 

0.0

Scott Regional Hospital

 

0

 

1

 

0.0



2010 Obstetrical Utilization by County

 

 

County

 

# Deliveries

#OB Beds

Occ Rate

 

 

 

 

39,174

 

565

 

42.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

University Hospital & Health System

 

Hinds

 

2,880

 

41

 

70.0

Forrest General Hospital

 

Forrest

 

2,357

 

35

 

59.7

North Mississippi Medical Center

 

Lee

 

2,254

 

64

 

32.0

Baptist Memorial Hospital

 

Desoto

 

2,018

 

0

 

0.0

River Oaks Hospital

 

Rankin

 

1,967

 

23

 

66.3

Wesley Medical Center

 

Lamar

 

1,582

 

0

 

0.0

Woman’s Hospital at River Oaks

 

Rankin

 

1,537

 

18

 

10.6

Memorial Hospital at Gulfport

 

Harrison

 

1,357

 

20

 

46.6

St. Dominic Jackson Memorial Hospital

 

Hinds

 

1,272

 

0

 

0.0

Anderson Regional Medical Center

 

Lauderdale

1,237

 

30

 

30.7

Baptist Memorial Hospital Union County

 

Union

 

1,113

 

0

 

0.0

Mississippi Baptist Medical Center

 

Hinds

 

1,045

 

40

 

23.5

Central Mississippi Medical Center

 

Hinds

 

1,025

 

0

 

0.0

Northwest Mississippi Regional Medical Center

 

Coahoma

 

976

 

11

 

90.2

Ocean Springs Hospital

 

Jackson

 

960

 

9

 

53.6

South Central Regional Medical Center

 

Jones

 

939

 

19

 

42.2

Southwest Mississippi Regional Medical Center

 

Pike

 

938

 

9

 

116.5

OCH Regional Medical Center

 

Oktibbeha

 

929

 

0

 

0.0

Baptist Memorial Hospital North Mississippi

 

Lafayette

 

911

 

0

 

0.0

Baptist Memorial Hospital Golden Triangle

 

Lowndes

 

907

 

17

 

60.6

Delta Regional Medical Center Main Campus

 

Washington

893

 

15

 

58.6

Rush Foundation Hospital

 

Lauderdale

881

 

18

 

41.3

River Region Health System

 

Warren

 

780

 

28

 

30.7

Greenwood Leflore Hospital

 

Leflore

 

757

 

16

 

40.6

Biloxi Regional Medical Center

 

Harrison

 

746

 

17

 

51.7

Singing River Hospital

 

Jackson

 

721

 

22

 

22.6

King’s Daughters Medical Center

 

Lincoln

 

640

 

0

 

0.0

Natchez Community Hospital

 

Adams

 

548

 

0

 

0.0

Gilmore Memorial Regional Medical Center

 

Monroe

 

536

 

15

 

25.8

Garden Park Medical Center

 

Harrison

 

519

 

9

 

35.2

Magnolia Regional Health Center

 

Alcorn

 

500

 

8

 

38.3

Natchez Regional Medical Center

 

Adams

 

459

 

19

 

16.5

Grenada Lake Medical Center

 

Grenada

 

451

 

0

 

0.0

Bolivar Medical Center

 

Bolivar

 

412

 

17

 

50.3

Highland Community Hospital

 

Pearl River

333

 

13

 

14.7

Riley Hospital

 

Lauderdale

332

 

5

 

54.9

South Sunflower County Hospital

 

Sunflower

 

261

 

0

 

0.0

Madison County Medical Center

 

Madison

 

243

 

0

 

0.0

North Mississippi Medical Center

 

West Point Clay

241

 

6

 

0.0

Wayne General Hospital

 

Wayne

 

220

 

7

 

33.3

Hancock Medical Center

 

Hancock

 

209

 

10

 

17.4

Tri Lakes Medical Center

 

Panola

 

169

 

0

 

0.0

Magee General Hospital

 

Simpson

 

104

 

4

 

14.5

Leake Memorial Hospital

 

Leake

 

6

 

0

 

0.0

King’s Daughters Hospital Yazoo County

 

Yazoo

 

4

 

0

 

0.0

Laird Hospital

 

Newton

 

2

 

0

 

0.0

Marion General Hospital

 

Marion

 

2

 

0

 

0.0

Scott Regional Hospital

 

Scott

 

1

 

0

 

0.0



State Cesarean Rate



Individual Facility Cesarean Rate Histories
A few hospitals with an average of 1000 births or more
SOURCE: Mississippi State Department of Health


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Reader Comments (15)

Thank you, Jill! I am positively giddy about having access to these numbers! My local hospital has the lowest c/s rate in the state --still too high at 21% but better than the next closet hospital............ North Mississippi Medical Center West Point at 72%. Rumor has it that tummy tucks are the norm for c/s patients in West Point.

September 19, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterLaura @ Our Messy Messy Life

I find this tragic, especially considering the debate taking place in MS over the 'personhood' of a fetus under Amendment 26. Great disparity between pre-natal and birth and postpartum care. It's clear women are not valued in Mississippi, at least not after they take their first breath, that is.

September 19, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterMaria

Please, Maria, at least MS values women BEFORE they are born, unlike people who uphold "birth" as some holy grail, but couldn't care less if the baby being birthed was killed before it was born or not. A C-Section is not worse than being killed. For the record, I am appalled by the numbers on these charts and am a supporter of ICAN and MS Friends of Midwives, but it has never made sense to me that some women who are all about "choice in childbirth" seem to forget the the result of childbirth is a CHILD. Why can't we love and care for BOTH the mother and baby 100%?

September 19, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterMichelle

As one of the numbers that made up those little red bars, I can say the high c-section rates don't surprise me. There are very few options in Mississippi for obstetric care, so you are made to feel you have very little choice in the matter. I'm not happy to see myself as part of such a sad statistic.

September 19, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterLindsey

Mississippi is also near the bottom in the CDC's breastfeeding report card for 2011, with only 50% of infants ever being breastfed for a moment, which I believe also ties in with the care and support given to mothers during and after birth.

September 19, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterKK

Woman's Hospital at 59% no surprise there as pretty much all patients are electively induced at 39 w 0 d (if not way before as apparently it is "dangerous" to be 4 cm).

September 19, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterSusan

How do you get these numbers, Jill? I'm waiting with bated breath for Missouri's.

September 19, 2011 | Unregistered Commentercrystal_b

OK, but as a former L&D/ perinatal O.R. nurse in a large hospital, some things are being ignored or overlooked in the article.
Many women WANT a C/S so they don't have to go through labor and delivery, and so they don't have to have that "ugly scar"....In South America its VERY common, I can't recall the stats, but maybe 80-90% of women schedule a C/S routinely. If not for pressure from various organizations in the U.S. I think the rate would be higher here, for those reasons.
Also, the high litigation rate in the U.S. is a HUGE factor.... If the baby is not "perfect"....and the time element can be up to or through first grade.....the doctor, hospital, even the RN's, can be sued. Most nations don't have that handicap: the choice to do a C/S should ideally be made as to what is best for baby/ mother....but in our country it is not.
The average layperson, I think, has no idea why vaginal delivery is preferable, and the same with breast feeding. Some hospitals have great breast feeding programs set up, others are just terrible. The Breast Feeding Coordinator at my last Hospital ENCOURAGED women to express or pump their breast milk into a container so the amount the baby took could be measured....How that helps bonding, or encourages the mother and child to find their own rhythm, is hard to imagine. I nursed my first child for over a year, and the second (while working full time as an RN) for 7 months. For the second child, I carried in to work several empty baby bottles, borrowed the L&D electric breast feeding machine, and at break time ate a sandwich in one hand, while pumping each breast with the other. Then the milk---I usually had two large baby bottles full---was refridgerated in a lunch box....the next day the baby sitter fed that milk to the baby, and so on....It worked well. I did not take extra time at lunch/break time, and other than having to purchase new tubing (for myself alone) for the breast pumping machine, it was easy, cheap, and the baby got the best of both worlds....nursed at home, and fed via bottle, but fed breast milk, when I was at work. However, so many companies will not allow, or encourage nursing moms to do something like that. In another hospital where I worked the breast pump was kept in the womens' BATHROOM! I suppose for fear of people seeing the nastiness of breast feeding!

September 20, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterMarie

Sadly, Marie, I think the argument so often hauled out about "SO MANY" women wanting c/s is kind of thin. First, the most liberal statistics on that point toward a fairly small population of women. Second, so what? If a patient wants to be given unlimited access to the morphine should they be given that too, just because they want it? It's the job of the OB, midwife, clinic nurse, etc. to EDUCATE these moms well in advance of their labors. Educate them not only of the risks of unnecessary surgery, but also of the benefits of labor (how many OBs are even aware there are any?), of various non-pharmacologic options for coping with labor, and refer them to someone who can provide that education if they are too ignorant to do it themselves.

Point two about that excuse: why is it alright to role women into surgery just because they ask, but not alright to support women in laboring under their own power just because they ask? VBACs, routine inductions for postdates/baby too big/mama too big/day too long/other flimsy non-evidence-based excuse..... Seriously? If a woman asks for needless major abdominal surgery then the poor sad doctor's hands are just tied and s/he's duty-bound to honor their request, but if a woman asks for support to birth on her own THAT is taking things too far?

Evidence has shown time and again that when doctors/midwives educate their clients during (and before) prenatal care, their position as authority figures goes far toward influencing client decisions and toward reducing the dreaded litigation. Any care provider who balks at finding some way to provide that education is just being lazy. Pointing the finger of blame at some mythical majority of women too-posh-to-push doesn't absolve them of that responsibility, in fact it increases it.

September 20, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterAron

Cesareans performed on maternal demand usually do not meet guidelines for informed consent. Women who understand the full risks and benefits of such a choice are unlikely to proceed with surgery. With the exception of plastic surgery, doctors rarely perform purely elective surgeries on demand. In addition, data indicate that many cesareans that are coded as being by maternal request were actually performed at the suggestion of the doctor. There are a number of research articles addressing this issue in the journal Birth. As informed consent for Cesarean in general is poorly executed and true informed consent is less likely for poor and/or non-white women, it seems there would be a high correlation between lack of informed consent and the high Cesarean rate in Mississippi, which has high proportions of both low-income and African American mothers.

September 20, 2011 | Unregistered Commenterpraminthehall
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